The T List: Five Things We Recommend This Week

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Welcome to the T List, a newsletter from the editors of T Magazine. Each week, we share things we’re eating, wearing, listening to or coveting now. Sign up here to find us in your inbox every Wednesday. And you can always reach us at [email protected].


Eat This

After a stint soaking up Sicilian cuisine and visiting flour mills, citrus groves and cheese makers at the Anna Tasca Lanza Cooking School southeast of Palermo, Ian Edwards, a former director of public relations at Alexander Wang, opened Tenuta, an Italian food market in North Canaan, Conn., with his partner, Travis Powell. The shop is organized not by food type but by family estate — tenuta in Italian — with Polaroids illustrating the makers and their process, which Edwards sees as a way to “emotionally connect patrons to the producers.” Some of the singular products on offer: red-onion mostarda; La Nicchia capers, enriched by the island of Pantelleria’s volcanic soil; stone-milled, bronze-cut Filippo Drago busiate pasta, the coarse texture of which “creates the perfect surface for sauces,” says Edwards. tenuta.market.

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Last year, Hedi Slimane, the creative director of Celine, introduced the Celine Artist Jewelry Program, a series of collaborations with the estates of some of his favorite 20th-century artists. The first installment was a necklace of compressed vermeil in the style of the French sculptor César; for the second, which launches this month, Slimane has chosen the pioneering American artist Louise Nevelson, known for her monumental works of mostly found objects often painted black, as well as her own personal style that incorporated self-made jewelry (which Slimane likens to “miniature sculptures”). Each necklace, from a limited edition of 50, is made of oakwood and either sterling silver or vermeil and features a pendant in Nevelson’s elegantly abstract sculptural manner, housed in a black box engraved with the artist’s signature. From $4,500, celine.com.


read This

For the past 25 years — ever since he shot a nude Kristen McMenamy with the word “Versace” scrawled across her chest and enclosed in a red lipstick heart in 1996 — Juergen Teller has been one of the most provocative, influential and in-demand fashion and celebrity photographers. But his pictures also often resonate beyond their commercial origins, and so a book-length monograph of his oeuvre is as welcome as it is overdue. “Donkey Man and Other Stories” is a collection of his voluminous magazine commissions; portraits of family members, fauna and landscapes; and brief reminiscences both by and of Teller. Iconic photos of Kurt Cobain, Charlotte Rampling, Kate Moss, et al., sit side by side with almost human-seeming frogs (a recurring motif) and invariably phallic still lifes. Regardless of subject matter, jarring juxtapositions are the rule: snails and peaches; nude models prancing in the Louvre; a callipygian Kim Kardashian in stockings and heels scaling a sandpit. $150,

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rizzoli.com.


drink This

Rafael Shin, the founder of the premium mezcal Agua Mágica, is determined to save tequila’s smokier cousin from its own popularity. Now that mezcal has assumed pride of place in many a common cocktail, the demand for the cheap stuff has spiked, leading to a race to the bottom as producers seek to fill the void. Shin, South Korean by birth but raised in Mexico, has gone wholly in the other direction, working solely with local mezcaleros in the Oaxacan town of San Juan del Río, whose soil, altitude and abundance of fresh river water have long lent it a certain mystique among mezcal makers. “The mission of our company is to redirect the growth of mezcal and preserve the local communities,” he says. The result, Agua Mágica, offers sweet and earthy notes of subtle smoke, banana and almond, and is intended to be savored neat or on the rocks. From $70, aguamagica.com.

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Fine jeweler Jessica McCormack’s devotion to diamonds extends even to how they’re housed. For her bespoke Luxury Heirloom Boxes, the designer, whose exquisite creations have been worn by Zoë Kravitz and Dakota Johnson, reimagines antique jewelry cases with hand marquetry and personalized silk-embroidered velvet interiors. And after a recent sold-out experimental collaboration with the Haas brothers — the artist duo renowned for their sculptures of surreal creatures — that “pushed my creative boundaries,” McCormack has teamed with them again on three new fantastical boxes in an epic juxtaposition of luxury and kook: an 18th-century satinwood ring box resting on a writhing mass of bronze tentacles; a double watch box in Georgian mahogany with drawers lined with embroidered cephalopods and a cabochon-inlaid tentacle-shaped tiepin; and a full-size jewelry box in Victorian coromandel wood with a secret drawer whose stitching depicts a sort of psychedelic orgy. jessicamccormack.com.


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